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» E. coli and developmental biology

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image: Building Gene Networks

Building Gene Networks

By | June 1, 2016

Synthetic biologists use natural genetic motifs to construct novel circuits.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Synthetic Biology Comes into Its Own

Synthetic Biology Comes into Its Own

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers create novel genetic circuits that give insight into, and are inspired by, nature.

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Week in Review: February 22–26

Week in Review: February 22–26

By | February 26, 2016

Questions about how E. coli evolves; spermatids in a dish; fighting bacteria with virus-like molecule; what drives metastasis; antibodies fight Ebola in monkeys

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image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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