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image: Trump Picks National Cancer Institute Director

Trump Picks National Cancer Institute Director

By | June 12, 2017

Ned Sharpless currently leads the cancer center at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

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image: Cell Lines Gain Cancer-Related Mutations

Cell Lines Gain Cancer-Related Mutations

By | April 27, 2017

A screen of human embryonic stem cell lines finds several that accumulated changes in the gene TP53, including aberrations commonly seen in cancer.

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image: Mining the Outliers

Mining the Outliers

By | April 1, 2015

Even when a clinical trial fails, some patients improve. What can researchers learn from these exceptional responders?

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image: Tracking Miracles

Tracking Miracles

By | April 1, 2015

A panel of oncologists discusses cases of exceptional responders, or cancer patients whose tumors disappear after a brief period of chemotherapy.

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image: Two-Faced RNAs

Two-Faced RNAs

By | April 1, 2015

The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.

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image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

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image: Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

By | April 1, 2013

Advances in genomics and cancer biology will alter the design of human cancer studies.

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image: BRCA1 Further Elucidated

BRCA1 Further Elucidated

By | October 27, 2011

Researchers have pinpointed the region of a key cancer gene that’s involved in tumor suppression.

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