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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: Mother’s Microbiome Shapes Offspring’s Immunity

Mother’s Microbiome Shapes Offspring’s Immunity

By | March 17, 2016

The maternal gut microbiome guides neo- and postnatal immune system development, a mouse study shows. 

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image: Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

Viral Remnants Help Regulate Human Immunity

By | March 3, 2016

Endogenous retroviruses in the human genome can regulate genes involved in innate immune responses.

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image: Restoring C-Section Babies’ Microbiota

Restoring C-Section Babies’ Microbiota

By | February 1, 2016

A small pilot study suggests exposure to maternal vaginal fluids could restore infant microbiota following Cesarean-section delivery.

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image: Fungal Security Force

Fungal Security Force

By | February 1, 2016

In yew trees, Taxol-producing fungi function as an immune system to ward off pathogens.

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image: Holding Their Ground

Holding Their Ground

By | February 1, 2016

To protect the global food supply, scientists want to understand—and enhance—plants’ natural resistance to pathogens.

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image: Plant Immunity

Plant Immunity

By | February 1, 2016

How plants fight off pathogens

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image: Pregnancy May Explain Ebola Return

Pregnancy May Explain Ebola Return

By | December 21, 2015

Health officials suspect recently reported cases of the disease in Liberia might stem from a flare-up of the virus in a survivor who became pregnant.

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image: Genetics, Immunity, and the Microbiome

Genetics, Immunity, and the Microbiome

By | September 16, 2015

The makeup of an individual’s microbiome correlates with genetic variation in immunity-related pathways, a study shows.

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image: Underground Immunity

Underground Immunity

By | July 16, 2015

Arabidopsis thaliana defense hormones shape the plant’s root microbiome. 

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