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image: Scanning for SIV’s Sanctuaries

Scanning for SIV’s Sanctuaries

By | May 1, 2015

Whole-body immunoPET scans of SIV-infected macaques reveal where the replicating virus hides.  

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image: Show Me Your Moves

Show Me Your Moves

By | May 1, 2015

Updated classics and new techniques help microbiologists get up close and quantitative.

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image: Soluble Signal

Soluble Signal

By | May 1, 2015

An immune protein previously thought to mark inactive T cells has a free-floating form that correlates with HIV disease progression.

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image: The Origins of O

The Origins of O

By | May 1, 2015

A strain of HIV that has afflicted more than 100,000 people emerged from gorillas.

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image: Defeating the Virus

Defeating the Virus

By | May 1, 2015

Recent discoveries are spurring a renaissance in HIV vaccine research and development.

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image: Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

Bacterial Taxis Deliver Proteins

By | April 28, 2015

Reengineered protein-shuttling machinery can be used to inject a particular protein into mammalian cells, according to a proof-of-principle study.

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image: Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

Protein Spurs T-Cell Proliferation

By | April 17, 2015

A newly discovered protein promotes immunity to viruses and cancer by triggering the production of cytotoxic T cells.

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image: How a Popular Probiotic Works

How a Popular Probiotic Works

By | April 16, 2015

Eating a type of bacterium encourages the activity of other gut microbes, according to a small study.

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image: Studying Ebola Survivors

Studying Ebola Survivors

By | April 6, 2015

A scientist jumps at the chance to study the blood of four Ebola survivors to better understand how the immune system responds to the deadly virus. 

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image: Enzyme Improves CRISPR

Enzyme Improves CRISPR

By | April 1, 2015

A smaller Cas9 protein enables in vivo genome engineering via viral vectors.

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