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image: Brains in Action

Brains in Action

By | February 1, 2014

Neuroscientists are automating neural imaging and recording, allowing them to monitor increasingly large swaths of the brain in living, behaving animals.  


image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts


image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus


image: Schizophrenia’s Intricacies

Schizophrenia’s Intricacies

By | January 23, 2014

Two studies provide insight into the genetics of the disorder and show again how complex it is.


image: New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

New Suspect in Bee Colony Collapse

By | January 21, 2014

A virus that causes blight in plants may contribute the catastrophic decline of honeybee colonies.


image: Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

Polymer Protects Mouse Heart

By | January 20, 2014

Injection of microscopic particles of a plastic-like material protects mice from cardiac tissue damage following heart attack.

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image: Older Trees Grow Faster

Older Trees Grow Faster

By | January 20, 2014

Mature trees soak up more CO2 than younger ones, a study shows, overturning a bit of botanical dogma.


image: Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

Review: Auditory Hallucinations, Composed

By | January 16, 2014

A pair of one-act chamber operas takes the audience inside the world of imagined sound. 


image: New Neuroscience Journal to Launch

New Neuroscience Journal to Launch

By | January 15, 2014

The publisher of The Journal of Neuroscience has laid out plans for an open-access, online-only journal for brain research.

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image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.


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