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image: Deploying the Body’s Army

Deploying the Body’s Army

By | April 1, 2014

Using patients’ own immune systems to fight cancer

3 Comments

image: Ballroom Brainwaves

Ballroom Brainwaves

By | March 28, 2014

A neuroscientist studies the brains of tango dancers in an attempt to understand interpersonal connectedness.

4 Comments

image: Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

Vitamin A’s Influence on Immunity

By | March 19, 2014

Exposure to vitamin A in the womb influences immune system development and lifelong ability to fight infections, a mouse study shows. 

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Lucky Planet</em>

Book Excerpt from Lucky Planet

By | March 1, 2014

In the book's prologue, author David Waltham compares a fictitious planet to Earth, highlighting the biologically supportive luck that our planet has enjoyed.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2014

The Sixth Extinction, Joy, Guilt, Anger, Love, Ha! The Science of When we Laugh and Why, and Ten Thousand Birds

1 Comment

image: Is Earth Special?

Is Earth Special?

By | March 1, 2014

Reconsidering the uniqueness of life on our planet

8 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2014

March 2014's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: Review: “Please Continue”

Review: “Please Continue”

By | February 11, 2014

A play that dramatizes Stanley Milgram’s infamous social psychology experiments from the 1960s captures the personal side of human research.

4 Comments

image: Week in Review: February 3–7

Week in Review: February 3–7

By | February 7, 2014

Federal stem cell regulations vary; Salmonella exploit host immune system; microglia help maintain synaptic connections; prosthesis re-creates feeling of touch

0 Comments

image: Immune Response Promotes Infection

Immune Response Promotes Infection

By | February 6, 2014

Salmonella enterica can exploit a standard immune response in mice to promote its own growth.

2 Comments

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