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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

By | March 2, 2013

The method to the dengue virus's maddening infectiousness.

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Bedeviled by Dengue

Bedeviled by Dengue

By | March 1, 2013

The global spread of dengue virus has immunologists and public-health experts debating the best way to curb infection.

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Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Icy Algae in a Changing Arctic

Icy Algae in a Changing Arctic

By | February 14, 2013

New research adds to an emerging picture of the changes that global warming and thinning ice are wreaking on the marine ecosystems at the top of the world.

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image: Sampling the New Arctic

Sampling the New Arctic

By | February 14, 2013

Scenes from a research trip, where researchers peered beneath the ice to shine a light on the emerging picture of a changing Arctic Ocean

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image: Diversity Defeats Disease

Diversity Defeats Disease

By | February 13, 2013

In a pond, more amphibian species mean decreased chances of disease spread.

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image: Do Mice Make Bad Models?

Do Mice Make Bad Models?

By | February 11, 2013

A study suggests that some mouse models do not accurately mimic human molecular mechanisms of inflammatory response, but other mouse strains may fare better.

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image: Oil Additive Harming Seabirds

Oil Additive Harming Seabirds

By | February 8, 2013

Scientists have identified the sticky substance that is damaging the feathers of hundreds seabirds washed ashore in England as an additive for lubricant oils.  

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