The Scientist

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image: Thirty Years of Progress

Thirty Years of Progress

By | October 1, 2016

Since The Scientist published its first issue in October 1986, life-science research has transformed from a manual and often tedious task to a high-tech, largely automated process of unprecedented efficiency.

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image: Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

Genes Linked to Dogs’ Sociability with People

By | September 30, 2016

Genetic variants on chromosome 26 appears to play a role in a dog’s tendency to turn to people for help.

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image: Circadian-Controlled Thirst

Circadian-Controlled Thirst

By | September 28, 2016

Scientists determine how the brain’s central clock regulates drinking prior to sleep in rodents.

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image: Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies in HIV Patients

By | September 28, 2016

Researchers identify aspects of the patient, the virus, and the infection itself that influence whether a person with HIV will produce broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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image: Facebook CEO’s Donation a Boon to Basic Science

Facebook CEO’s Donation a Boon to Basic Science

By | September 25, 2016

But can $3 billion dollars meet the lofty goals of the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative?

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The National Institutes of Health is hosting a two-day conference on how the virus affects infants and children. The take-home message so far: microcephaly is but one of many potential problems for Zika-exposed fetuses.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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Matching the immunological characteristics of donor retinal cells to those of the recipient can reduce the chance of rejection.

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image: Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma

Neonatal Gut Bacteria Might Promote Asthma

By | September 12, 2016

Byproducts of gut microbes in some 1-month–old babies trigger inflammation that is linked to later asthma development, researchers find.

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