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The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

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image: Messing with the Microbiome

Messing with the Microbiome

By | July 17, 2017

Two new techniques allow researchers to manipulate the activity of gut bacteria. 

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image: Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

Mini-Metagenomics Leads to Microbial Discovery

By | July 14, 2017

Researchers develop a method that combines the strengths of shotgun metagenomics and single-cell genome sequencing in a microfluidics-based platform.

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image: Earth Experiencing Sixth Mass Extinction: Study

Earth Experiencing Sixth Mass Extinction: Study

By | July 11, 2017

Scientists describe the number of vertebrate species experiencing population declines as “biological annihilation.”

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image: Opinion: Use Pollution Models to Support Stream Sampling

Opinion: Use Pollution Models to Support Stream Sampling

By and | July 11, 2017

Modeling gives insight to the critical role of streamflow conditions when assessing the concentrations of endocrine disrupting compounds.  

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image: Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

By | July 10, 2017

Herbivores may take to omnivory and eat conspecifics when the plants they feed on produce unsavory protective chemicals.

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image: Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

By | July 5, 2017

Mitochondrial DNA in Neanderthal bone suggests humans first left Africa earlier than previously thought.

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Students will not learn the theory in primary and secondary schools nationwide. 

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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The discovery of peptides, enzymes, and other gene products that confer antibiotic resistance could give clues to how it develops.

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