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image: Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

Evolution of Fish Bioluminescence

By | June 9, 2016

Fish evolved to make their own light at least 27 times, according to a study.

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A transposon underlies this classic story of evolutionary adaptation.

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image: Contributors


By | June 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2016 issue of The Scientist.


image: Enhancing Vaccine Development

Enhancing Vaccine Development

By | June 1, 2016

Using proteomics methods to inform antigen selection

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image: Start Making Sense

Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.


image: Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

By | June 1, 2016

Pooping into a petri dish is becoming standard practice as part of some college biology courses.


Member, Department of Immunology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Age: 43


image: Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

By | June 1, 2016

Lacing insect food with microbes encoding double-stranded RNAs can suppress insect gene expression.


image: Toward Targeted Therapies for Autoimmune Disorders

Toward Targeted Therapies for Autoimmune Disorders

By | June 1, 2016

Training the immune system to cease fire on native tissues could improve outcomes for autoimmune patients, but clinical progress has been slow.


Caltech’s Frances Arnold is honored for her work on directed evolution.

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