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» immunology, evolution and neuroscience

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Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2015

Stoned, Anxious, The Deeper Genome, and Testosterone

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High-Flying Ducks

By | July 1, 2015

Five species of waterfowl have evolved a variety of adaptations to adjust to the high altitude of South America’s Lake Titicaca.

1 Comment

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How to Make a New Species

By | July 1, 2015

Scientists mutate a mating pheromone and its corresponding receptor in yeast to promote speciation.

3 Comments

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Speaking of Science

By | July 1, 2015

July 2015's selection of notable quotes

5 Comments

image: Diagnosing Ebola in 15 Minutes

Diagnosing Ebola in 15 Minutes

By | June 30, 2015

A new test that scans for the Ebola virus with just a fingerprick could be a practical diagnostic for use in West Africa.

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image: Sex Differences in Pain Pathway

Sex Differences in Pain Pathway

By | June 29, 2015

Male and female mice utilize different immune cells to process pain, a study shows.

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image: New Human Brain Language Map

New Human Brain Language Map

By | June 26, 2015

Researchers find that Wernicke’s area, thought to be the seat of language comprehension in the human brain for more than a century, is not.

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image: Week in Review: June 22–26

Week in Review: June 22–26

By | June 26, 2015

Neanderthal-human hybrid discovered; the neurobiology of fear behavior; and an insulin patch that responds to high glucose levels in mice

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image: The Brain on Fear

The Brain on Fear

By | June 25, 2015

Scientists uncover the neurons in the mouse brain responsible for linking the sight of a looming object to scared behavior.

1 Comment

image: Roos Are Mainly South Paws

Roos Are Mainly South Paws

By | June 22, 2015

A new study shows that kangaroos are predominantly left-handed.

2 Comments

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