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image: Nobel Laureate Dies

Nobel Laureate Dies

By | September 26, 2013

David Hubel, who helped revolutionize the understanding of visual information processing, has passed away at age 87.

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image: Celebrated Neuroscientist Dies

Celebrated Neuroscientist Dies

By | September 23, 2013

Candace Pert, who helped discover opioid receptors, has passed away at age 67.

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image: Week in Review: September 2–6

Week in Review: September 2–6

By | September 6, 2013

More than 320,000 mammalian viruses lurk; evolution of echolocation in bats and dolphins; accumulation of mutations in drug-resistant tuberculosis; senior researchers reluctant to retire

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image: Surprising Similarities in Divergent Genomes

Surprising Similarities in Divergent Genomes

By | September 4, 2013

Researchers find genome-wide evidence of convergent evolution between bats and dolphins.

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image: Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

Decoding Drug-Resistant TB

By | September 1, 2013

Researchers characterize drug-resistant tuberculosis by analyzing the genomes of more than 500 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from around the world.

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image: Putting the Men in Menopause

Putting the Men in Menopause

By | September 1, 2013

Can mating behavior explain the evolution of menopause in humans?

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2013

September 2013's selection of notable quotes

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image: Why Women Lose Fertility

Why Women Lose Fertility

By | September 1, 2013

Mating behavior is an unlikely driver of women's reproductive aging.

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image: Electric Fish Kin Wired Differently

Electric Fish Kin Wired Differently

By | August 29, 2013

Two new species of closely related electric fishes discovered in the Amazon produce very different electrical signals: one AC, the other DC.

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image: Lab-Grown Model Brains

Lab-Grown Model Brains

By | August 28, 2013

Three-dimensional tissues called “cerebral organoids” can model the earliest stages of brain development.

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