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image: Lubchenco on Conservation

Lubchenco on Conservation

By | July 17, 2017

Former NOAA administrator and environmental scientist Jane Lunchenco discusses the importance of science in the face of climate change.

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image: Oceans’ Ambassador

Oceans’ Ambassador

By | July 17, 2017

Jane Lubchenco has embraced many roles: marine ecologist, science communicator, federal agency administrator, and sustainable fishing advocate.

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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The presence of similar light-emitting enzymes in the distantly related organisms lends new insight into bioluminescence evolution.

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image: Earth Experiencing Sixth Mass Extinction: Study

Earth Experiencing Sixth Mass Extinction: Study

By | July 11, 2017

Scientists describe the number of vertebrate species experiencing population declines as “biological annihilation.”

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image: Opinion: Use Pollution Models to Support Stream Sampling

Opinion: Use Pollution Models to Support Stream Sampling

By and | July 11, 2017

Modeling gives insight to the critical role of streamflow conditions when assessing the concentrations of endocrine disrupting compounds.  

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image: Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

Caterpillars Turn to Cannibalism: Study

By | July 10, 2017

Herbivores may take to omnivory and eat conspecifics when the plants they feed on produce unsavory protective chemicals.

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image: Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

Neanderthal-Human Interbreeding Got an Early Start

By | July 5, 2017

Mitochondrial DNA in Neanderthal bone suggests humans first left Africa earlier than previously thought.

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Students will not learn the theory in primary and secondary schools nationwide. 

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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