The Scientist

» immunology, genetics & genomics and culture

Most Recent

image: Custom Creatures?

Custom Creatures?

By | January 6, 2015

San Francisco-based biotech wants to see its technology applied for inventing new organisms.

0 Comments

image: Fat to the Rescue

Fat to the Rescue

By | January 5, 2015

Adipocytes under the skin help fight infections by producing an antimicrobial agent.

2 Comments

image: A Movable Defense

A Movable Defense

By | January 1, 2015

In the evolutionary arms race between pathogens and hosts, genetic elements known as transposons are regularly recruited as assault weapons for cellular defense.

4 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

0 Comments

image: Doris Bachtrog: Sex Chromosome Wrangler

Doris Bachtrog: Sex Chromosome Wrangler

By | January 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley. Age: 39

0 Comments

image: Innovation Renovation

Innovation Renovation

By | January 1, 2015

Is the fear of funding and doing fundamental, risky research killing our ability to make breakthroughs?

3 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2015

January 2015's selection of notable quotes

2 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

image: Mistaken Identities

Mistaken Identities

By | January 1, 2015

Researchers are working to automate the arduous task of identifying—and amending—mislabeled sequences in genetic databases.

1 Comment

image: Molecular Hub of Autism?

Molecular Hub of Autism?

By | December 30, 2014

Researchers identify a network that includes many genes previously linked to autism spectrum disorders.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

  3. Government Nixes Teaching Evolution in Turkish Schools
  4. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
AAAS