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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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Obesity-associated microbiome composition can persist after weight loss, affecting the exchange of metabolites between a mouse and its resident bugs, researchers report.

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image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

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image: AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

By | November 15, 2016

A tool that uses machine learning algorithms to comb and categorize the scientific literature is making waves in neuroscience.

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image: More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

By | November 9, 2016

Researchers say they have sufficient in vitro and animal data to apply for human testing.

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Family members with a certain gene variant had unnecessary interventions, highlighting the potential hazards of precision medicine.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Neural Network Found That Helps Control Breathing

Neural Network Found That Helps Control Breathing

By | November 1, 2016

The results suggest that breathing is orchestrated by three—rather than two—excitatory circuits in the medulla.

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