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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

By | June 1, 2017

Fruit flies and mice grow better and eat less when the amino acid balance of their food reflects that coded by their exomes.

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image: Long-Term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

Long-Term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

By | June 1, 2017

In mice, cells in the prefrontal cortex—where memories are maintained long-term—start to encode a fearful experience right from the start.

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image: Infographic: Cook Up an Exome-Based Diet

Infographic: Cook Up an Exome-Based Diet

By | June 1, 2017

See how scientists designed food with amino acid compositions based on protein-coding regions in the genomes of mice and fruit flies.

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image: No Place to Hide

No Place to Hide

By | May 31, 2017

Environmental DNA is tracking down difficult-to-detect species, from rock snot in the U.S. to cave salamanders in Croatia.

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image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

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image: Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

Grad Student Acquitted in Thesis-Sharing Case

By | May 25, 2017

Diego Gomez was facing jail time in Colombia for posting someone else’s copyrighted thesis online.

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image: Companies Pursue Diagnostics that Mine the Microbiome

Companies Pursue Diagnostics that Mine the Microbiome

By | May 23, 2017

Tests so far typically screen for risky patterns that may augment traditional types of clinical data.

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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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Thirty percent of bacteria found in babies' guts came from mothers' milk, a study finds.

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