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image: Animal Magnetism

Animal Magnetism

By | May 1, 2016

A photosensitive protein behind the retinas of cockroaches plays a role in light-dependent, directional magnetosensitivity.

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image: Becoming Acculturated

Becoming Acculturated

By | May 1, 2016

Techniques for deep dives into the microbial dark matter

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | May 1, 2016

An alternative route to sparking cell signals involves hook-ups between transmembrane and soluble ligands.

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image: Kissing Cousins

Kissing Cousins

By | May 1, 2016

Researchers discover a completely novel mechanism of cell signaling involving soluble chemokines and their transmembrane equivalents.

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image: Microbial Ice-Makers

Microbial Ice-Makers

By | April 26, 2016

How one bacterium turns water into ice at nonfreezing temperatures

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image: Branching Out

Branching Out

By | April 11, 2016

Researchers create a new tree of life, largely composed of mystery bacteria.

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image: Cancer's Vanguard

Cancer's Vanguard

By | April 1, 2016

Exosomes are emerging as key players in metastasis.

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image: Cancerous Conduits

Cancerous Conduits

By | April 1, 2016

Metastatic cancer cells use nanotubes to manipulate blood vessels.

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image: Tumor Traps

Tumor Traps

By | April 1, 2016

After surgery to remove a tumor, neutrophils recruited to the site spit out sticky webs of DNA that aid cancer recurrence.

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image: Immune Influence

Immune Influence

By | April 1, 2016

In recent years, research has demonstrated that microbes living in and on the mammalian body can affect cancer risk, as well as responses to cancer treatment.

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