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image: Long Live Collagen

Long Live Collagen

By | March 1, 2015

Increased collagen expression is a common feature of many different pathways to extended longevity in worms.

3 Comments

image: Of Cells and Limits

Of Cells and Limits

By | March 1, 2015

Leonard Hayflick has been unafraid to speak his mind, whether it is to upend a well-entrenched dogma or to challenge the federal government. At 86, he’s nowhere near retirement.

3 Comments

image: Rethinking Telomeres

Rethinking Telomeres

By | March 1, 2015

Not only do telomeres protect the ends of chromosomes, they also modulate gene expression over cells’ lifetimes.

2 Comments

image: Medical Equipment May Spread Superbug

Medical Equipment May Spread Superbug

By | February 20, 2015

Drug-resistant bacteria have spread in a Los Angeles hospital, perhaps from contaminated endoscopes.

1 Comment

image: Subway Microbiome

Subway Microbiome

By | February 9, 2015

Researchers document the bacterial life living among New York City’s transit stations.

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image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

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image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.

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image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

1 Comment

image: The Energy of Life

The Energy of Life

By | February 1, 2015

Extremophiles should not be viewed through an anthropocentric lens; what’s extreme for us may be a perfectly comfortable environment for a microbe.

3 Comments

image: UV Light Doesn’t Fully Purify

UV Light Doesn’t Fully Purify

By | January 28, 2015

Using ultraviolet light to disinfect drinking water may simply drive bacteria to dormancy, rather than kill them.

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