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image: Infographic: Cook Up an Exome-Based Diet

Infographic: Cook Up an Exome-Based Diet

By | June 1, 2017

See how scientists designed food with amino acid compositions based on protein-coding regions in the genomes of mice and fruit flies.

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image: Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

Researchers Discover Salt-Loving Methanogens

By | May 26, 2017

Two previously overlooked archaeal strains fill an evolutionary gap for microbes.

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image: Companies Pursue Diagnostics that Mine the Microbiome

Companies Pursue Diagnostics that Mine the Microbiome

By | May 23, 2017

Tests so far typically screen for risky patterns that may augment traditional types of clinical data.

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Thirty percent of bacteria found in babies' guts came from mothers' milk, a study finds.

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image: Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

By | May 8, 2017

Bacterial differences after three-month temperature hikes, modeled after global warming predictions, were evident one year later, a study found.

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image: Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

By | May 1, 2017

Researchers are redesigning the humble brick to produce electricity, to clean water and air, and to harvest valuable compounds.

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Time-lapse imaging shows the immune cells transferring chemical signals during pigment pattern formation in developing zebrafish.

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Scientists discover transcripts from the same gene that can express both proteins and noncoding RNA.  

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image: Rare T Cells Fight Cancer

Rare T Cells Fight Cancer

By | May 1, 2017

A new approach to immunotherapy finds that the immune-cell clonotypes that come to the rescue start out at very low frequencies.

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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