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image: Logically Illogical

Logically Illogical

By | January 1, 2016

The most bizarre behaviors often make perfect sense in the minds of the mentally ill.

3 Comments

image: Managing Methylation

Managing Methylation

By | January 1, 2016

A long noncoding RNA associated with DNA methylation has the power to regulate colon cancer growth in vitro.

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image: Practical Proteomes

Practical Proteomes

By | January 1, 2016

Cell type–specific proteomic analyses are now possible from paraffin-embedded tissues.

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image: Smooth Move

Smooth Move

By | January 1, 2016

In the mouse lung, hardening of a blood vessel can result from just a single progenitor cell forming new smooth muscle.

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image: Telomerase Overdrive

Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

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image: To Retain a Brain

To Retain a Brain

By | January 1, 2016

Exceptional neural fossil preservation helps answer questions about ancient arthropod evolution.

1 Comment

image: Legacies Left Behind in 2015

Legacies Left Behind in 2015

By | December 31, 2015

A look at the contributions of some of the prominent researchers who died this year

3 Comments

image: Top Technical Advances 2015

Top Technical Advances 2015

By | December 24, 2015

The Scientist’s choice of major improvements in imaging, optogenetics, single-cell analyses, and CRISPR

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image: Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

Genes’ Cycles Change with Age

By | December 23, 2015

As the rhythmic expression of many genes falls out of sync in older human brains, a subset of transcripts gain rhythmicity with age.

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image: Algal Toxin Hurts Sea Lion Memory

Algal Toxin Hurts Sea Lion Memory

By | December 16, 2015

Results could explain why the marine mammals have been stranding on the West coast in record numbers.

0 Comments

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