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image: Long Live Collagen

Long Live Collagen

By | March 1, 2015

Increased collagen expression is a common feature of many different pathways to extended longevity in worms.

3 Comments

image: Rethinking Telomeres

Rethinking Telomeres

By | March 1, 2015

Not only do telomeres protect the ends of chromosomes, they also modulate gene expression over cells’ lifetimes.

2 Comments

image: Tricky Transfections

Tricky Transfections

By | March 1, 2015

A combination of microinjection and electroporation inserts genes into hard-to-reach cells.

2 Comments

image: Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

By | February 18, 2015

Cannabinoids cause appetite-suppressing neurons to produce an appetite-stimulating hormone in mice.

1 Comment

image: “Inner GPS” Support

“Inner GPS” Support

By | February 5, 2015

Grid cells—the neurons that function as a spatial navigation system—require input from another set of neurons, a rat study shows.

2 Comments

image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

0 Comments

image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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image: Brain Cells Behind Overeating

Brain Cells Behind Overeating

By | January 29, 2015

Scientists have defined mouse neurons responsible for excessive food consumption at an unprecedented level of detail. 

1 Comment

image: Filming the Nematode Brain

Filming the Nematode Brain

By | January 26, 2015

Researchers record the first whole-brain videos of an unrestrained animal, viewing neural activity as a roundworm moved freely around a Petri dish.

0 Comments

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