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image: Gambling on Reproducibility

Gambling on Reproducibility

By | November 10, 2015

New research finds that observers placing bets in a stock exchange–like environment are pretty good at predicting the replicability of psychology studies.

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image: A Literature Database with Smarts

A Literature Database with Smarts

By | November 3, 2015

Semantic Scholar uses machine reading and vision to extract meaning and impact from academic papers.

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image: Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

By | November 1, 2015

How the foods that make us fattest are not that different from heroin and cocaine

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image: Embracing the Unknown

Embracing the Unknown

By | November 1, 2015

Researchers are showing that ambiguity can be essential to brain development.

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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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image: Fat Saps Muscle

Fat Saps Muscle

By | November 1, 2015

The accumulation of fat within skeletal muscle, as happens with obesity, diminishes muscle performance.

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image: Heady Stuff

Heady Stuff

By | November 1, 2015

New research on how fat influences brain neuronal activity

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image: Remote Mind Control

Remote Mind Control

By | November 1, 2015

Using chemogenetic tools to spur the brain into action

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image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Rewarding Companions

Rewarding Companions

By | October 26, 2015

Oxytocin and social contact together modulate endocannabinoid activity in the mouse brain, which could help explain the prosocial effects of marijuana use. 

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