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image: Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

By | December 1, 2016

Cells with the best traction on a substrate pull their neighbors toward firmer ground.

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Spruce and pine and have relied on similar genetic toolkits for climate adaptation despite millions of years of evolution.

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: Speaking of Neuroscience

Speaking of Neuroscience

By and | November 18, 2016

A selection of notable quotes from the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting

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image: Hot Topics at SfN

Hot Topics at SfN

By | November 18, 2016

Researchers at this year’s Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego, California, discuss what they found most interesting.

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image: Scientists Fingerprint the Brain

Scientists Fingerprint the Brain

By | November 17, 2016

The brain’s structural connections are unique to an individual, a new imaging technique reveals.

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image: Neuroscience in a Nutshell

Neuroscience in a Nutshell

By | November 16, 2016

Sessions at the ongoing Society for Neuroscience meeting have covered topics from brain development to emotional processing.

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image: Categorizing Brain Cells

Categorizing Brain Cells

By | November 16, 2016

Researchers at the Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego discuss new efforts to perform single-cell analyses on the brain’s billions of cells.

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image: AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

By | November 15, 2016

A tool that uses machine learning algorithms to comb and categorize the scientific literature is making waves in neuroscience.

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image: Probing Exercise’s Effects on Cognitive Function

Probing Exercise’s Effects on Cognitive Function

By | November 14, 2016

Researchers at the Society for Neuroscience discuss what we know—and don’t—about how physical activity affects the brain.

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