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Spruce and pine and have relied on similar genetic toolkits for climate adaptation despite millions of years of evolution.

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image: Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

By | December 1, 2016

Successful late-stage clinical trials could mark the maturation of a new drug development platform, but the path to commercialization is not without hurdles.

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

By | November 29, 2016

Life at the bottom of the pecking order ramps up inflammation, according to new research, an effect that appears to be reversible.

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image: More than 40 New Papers on Epigenetics Published

More than 40 New Papers on Epigenetics Published

By | November 22, 2016

The International Human Epigenome Consortium presents a series of studies on how epigenetics influences immunity, cell lineage determination, and differentiation.

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image: AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

By | November 15, 2016

A tool that uses machine learning algorithms to comb and categorize the scientific literature is making waves in neuroscience.

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image: More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

By | November 9, 2016

Researchers say they have sufficient in vitro and animal data to apply for human testing.

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Family members with a certain gene variant had unnecessary interventions, highlighting the potential hazards of precision medicine.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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