The Scientist

» literature and culture

Most Recent

image: Hormone Hangover

Hormone Hangover

By | February 1, 2016

Medication to prevent prematurity in humans harms cognitive flexibility in rats.

0 Comments

image: Hydropowered Pollen

Hydropowered Pollen

By | February 1, 2016

A tension-sensing ion channel regulates hydration and germination in pollen.

0 Comments

image: Scientific Literacy Redefined

Scientific Literacy Redefined

By | February 1, 2016

Researchers could become better at engaging in public discourse by more fully considering the social and cultural contexts of their work.

9 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | February 1, 2016

February 2016's selection of notable quotes

1 Comment

image: AAUP Champion Dies

AAUP Champion Dies

By | January 26, 2016

Jordan Kurland, associate general secretary of the American Association of University Professors, has passed away at age 87. 

0 Comments

image: Study: Transparency Lacking in Biomedical Literature

Study: Transparency Lacking in Biomedical Literature

By | January 4, 2016

Few authors make their full data available and most published papers do not clearly state funding sources and conflicts of interest.

3 Comments

image: Managing Methylation

Managing Methylation

By | January 1, 2016

A long noncoding RNA associated with DNA methylation has the power to regulate colon cancer growth in vitro.

0 Comments

image: Smooth Move

Smooth Move

By | January 1, 2016

In the mouse lung, hardening of a blood vessel can result from just a single progenitor cell forming new smooth muscle.

0 Comments

image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | January 1, 2016

January 2016's selection of notable quotes

0 Comments

image: Telomerase Overdrive

Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine
  2. Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists
    The Nutshell Thomson Reuters Predicts Nobelists

    According to citation statistics, researchers behind programmed cell death pathways and CRISPR/Cas9 are among those in line for Nobel Prizes this year.

  3. Sequencing Reveals Genomic Diversity of the Human Brain
  4. Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts
    The Nutshell Reviewing Results-Free Manuscripts

    An open-access journal is trialing a peer-review process in which reviewers do not have access to the results or discussion sections of submitted papers.

RayBiotech