Most Recent

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2017 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

Genes’ Composition Guides More-Optimal Diets

By | June 1, 2017

Fruit flies and mice grow better and eat less when the amino acid balance of their food reflects that coded by their exomes.

2 Comments

The human brain’s insular cortex is adept at registering distaste for everything from rotten fruit to unfamiliar cultures.

1 Comment

image: Long-term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

Long-term Memory Storage Begins Immediately

By | June 1, 2017

In mice, cells in the prefrontal cortex—where memories are maintained long-term—start to encode a fearful experience right from the start.

1 Comment

image: The Search for Methods to Monitor Brain Cooling

The Search for Methods to Monitor Brain Cooling

By | June 1, 2017

Newborns deprived of oxygen have their temperatures lowered to protect against brain damage, but it’s hard to decipher the babies’ immediate response to the intervention.

0 Comments

image: Brain Freeze

Brain Freeze

By | June 1, 2017

Meet one child saved from brain damage by cooling therapy.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Cook Up an Exome-Based Diet

Infographic: Cook Up an Exome-Based Diet

By | June 1, 2017

See how scientists designed food with amino acid compositions based on protein-coding regions in the genomes of mice and fruit flies.

0 Comments

image: Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

Infographic: Plastics’ Effects

By | June 1, 2017

Lab studies suggest that plastic pollutants in the environment could have detrimental effects on animals’ physiology.

0 Comments

Synaptic connections and a new neuron type emerge in high-res images, which hold promise for mapping the complete connectome.

1 Comment

The Stanford University psychiatrist and neuroscientist known for his contributions to optogenetics and tissue clearing is awarded €4 million by the Fresenius Research Prize.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS