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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Newly Found White Blood Cell Withstands Chemotherapy

Newly Found White Blood Cell Withstands Chemotherapy

By | January 1, 2017

Vaccine-induced macrophages open a new realm of study into remodeling the immune system to reduce the risk of infections during cancer treatment.

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image: Pharma Redo

Pharma Redo

By | January 1, 2017

Steve Braun of Cures Within Reach, a nonprofit focused on breathing new life into old medicines, describes the potential benefits of drug repurposing.

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image: RNA Sequences Don’t Predict In Vivo Transcript Structure

RNA Sequences Don’t Predict In Vivo Transcript Structure

By | January 1, 2017

Eukaryotes prevent secondary RNA structures called G-quadruplexes, commonly observed in vitro, from forming in the cell. 

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image: Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

By | January 1, 2017

Plants grown in dry soil produce offspring that are hardier in drought conditions, and DNA methylation appears responsible. 

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image: Infographic: Examining Open Chromatin

Infographic: Examining Open Chromatin

By | January 1, 2017

See how researchers visualize regions of active genes.

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image: Infographic: Keeping RNA Structures in Line

Infographic: Keeping RNA Structures in Line

By | January 1, 2017

Scientists find fewer RNA G-quadruplexes in vivo than in vitro.

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Oncologists have raised concerns about a mouse study that suggests the vaccine for human papillomavirus could cause brain damage.

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image: Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

By | December 2, 2016

Andrzej Tarkowski’s research laid the groundwork for future advances in cloning, stem cell research, and in vitro fertilization.

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image: Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

By | December 1, 2016

Cells with the best traction on a substrate pull their neighbors toward firmer ground.

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