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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Neural Network Found That Helps Control Breathing

Neural Network Found That Helps Control Breathing

By | November 1, 2016

The results suggest that breathing is orchestrated by three—rather than two—excitatory circuits in the medulla.

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Results from experiments in mice revise a long-held hypothesis that certain protein scaffolds are needed for synaptic activity.

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

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image: Another Neural Circuit that Controls Breathing Found

Another Neural Circuit that Controls Breathing Found

By | November 1, 2016

This third excitatory network helps to regulate postinspiration.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

Ciliates Are Genetic-Code Deviants

By | October 1, 2016

Traditional stop codons have a double meaning in the protozoans' mRNA, sometimes calling for an amino acid during translation.

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image: Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

Do Brighter Species’ Brains Emit Redder Light?

By | October 1, 2016

Photon emissions in the brain are red-shifted in more-intelligent species, though scientists dispute what that means.

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image: Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

Protozoans Found With No Dedicated Stop Codons

By | October 1, 2016

Some ciliates use the same trio of nucleotides to code for an amino acid and to stop translation.

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image: Some Human Cancers Exhibit Low-grade Inflammation

Some Human Cancers Exhibit Low-grade Inflammation

By | October 1, 2016

NSAIDs reduce this "parainflammation," hinting at how they help lower cancer risk.

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