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image: Hydropowered Pollen

Hydropowered Pollen

By | February 1, 2016

A tension-sensing ion channel regulates hydration and germination in pollen.

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image: Study: Transparency Lacking in Biomedical Literature

Study: Transparency Lacking in Biomedical Literature

By | January 4, 2016

Few authors make their full data available and most published papers do not clearly state funding sources and conflicts of interest.

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image: Managing Methylation

Managing Methylation

By | January 1, 2016

A long noncoding RNA associated with DNA methylation has the power to regulate colon cancer growth in vitro.

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image: Smooth Move

Smooth Move

By | January 1, 2016

In the mouse lung, hardening of a blood vessel can result from just a single progenitor cell forming new smooth muscle.

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image: Telomerase Overdrive

Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

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image: Carry-On Luggage

Carry-On Luggage

By | December 1, 2015

Without a vacuole, cell-cycle progression stalls out in yeast cells.

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image: Getting Back in Shape

Getting Back in Shape

By | December 1, 2015

Contrary to years of research suggesting otherwise, most aggregated proteins regain their shape and functionality following heat shock.

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image: Looking for Loners

Looking for Loners

By | December 1, 2015

A new algorithm opens doors for detecting rare cell types in mRNA sequencing.

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image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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