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image: Smooth Move

Smooth Move

By | January 1, 2016

In the mouse lung, hardening of a blood vessel can result from just a single progenitor cell forming new smooth muscle.

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image: Telomerase Overdrive

Telomerase Overdrive

By | January 1, 2016

Two mutations in a gene involved in telomere extension reverse the gene’s epigenetic silencing.

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Carry-On Luggage

By | December 1, 2015

Without a vacuole, cell-cycle progression stalls out in yeast cells.

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image: Getting Back in Shape

Getting Back in Shape

By | December 1, 2015

Contrary to years of research suggesting otherwise, most aggregated proteins regain their shape and functionality following heat shock.

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image: Looking for Loners

Looking for Loners

By | December 1, 2015

A new algorithm opens doors for detecting rare cell types in mRNA sequencing.

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image: Self Correction

Self Correction

By | December 1, 2015

What to do when you realize your publication is fatally flawed

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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image: Gambling on Reproducibility

Gambling on Reproducibility

By | November 10, 2015

New research finds that observers placing bets in a stock exchange–like environment are pretty good at predicting the replicability of psychology studies.

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image: Blood Cell Development Reimagined

Blood Cell Development Reimagined

By | November 9, 2015

A new study is rewriting 50 years of biological dogma by suggesting that mature blood cells develop much more rapidly from stem cells than previously thought.

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image: A Literature Database with Smarts

A Literature Database with Smarts

By | November 3, 2015

Semantic Scholar uses machine reading and vision to extract meaning and impact from academic papers.

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