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image: Sound and Light Show

Sound and Light Show

By | October 1, 2014

Sounds trigger a response in the visual cortex that predicts how accurately a person can identify a visual target.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.


image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.


image: Retraction Notices Delayed

Retraction Notices Delayed

By | July 1, 2014

Indexing of retractions on PubMed is not immediate; some are delayed for years.


image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 


image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: SCI Celebrates 50th Anniversary

SCI Celebrates 50th Anniversary

By | May 14, 2014

The world’s first systematic citation index celebrates a golden milestone this year.


image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.


image: Opinion: Latent Value in the Literature

Opinion: Latent Value in the Literature

By | April 28, 2014

With scientific budgets eroding, the biomedical community needs to get more return from the data it has already generated.


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