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image: AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

By | November 15, 2016

A tool that uses machine learning algorithms to comb and categorize the scientific literature is making waves in neuroscience.

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image: More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

By | November 9, 2016

Researchers say they have sufficient in vitro and animal data to apply for human testing.

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Family members with a certain gene variant had unnecessary interventions, highlighting the potential hazards of precision medicine.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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image: Neural Network Found That Helps Control Breathing

Neural Network Found That Helps Control Breathing

By | November 1, 2016

The results suggest that breathing is orchestrated by three—rather than two—excitatory circuits in the medulla.

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Results from experiments in mice revise a long-held hypothesis that certain protein scaffolds are needed for synaptic activity.

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image: Another Neural Circuit that Controls Breathing Found

Another Neural Circuit that Controls Breathing Found

By | November 1, 2016

This third excitatory network helps to regulate postinspiration.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | October 24, 2016

Virus’s effect on RNA methylation; identifying brain cells targeted by Zika; virus found in vaginal secretions for two weeks after infection; updated CDC recommendations for Miami

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image: Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

Nixing NETs to Prevent Metastasis

By | October 19, 2016

Researchers discover that neutrophil extracellular traps help cancers spread, and design enzyme-loaded nanoparticles to destroy them.

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Once implanted in mice, the edited stem cells produced normal hemoglobin.

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