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image: Sweet and Low

Sweet and Low

By | October 1, 2015

Glucose activates sleep-promoting neurons in the mouse hypothalamus.

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image: Hearing Discrepancy Probed

Hearing Discrepancy Probed

By | September 1, 2015

Common in vitro experiments have distorted the true mechanics of mammalian hair cell stereocilia.

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image: The Regenerators

The Regenerators

By | September 1, 2015

A molecular signature makes it possible to trace the details of hair cell replacement in the mammalian inner ear.

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image: Butterflies in Peril

Butterflies in Peril

By | August 12, 2015

Several recent studies point to serious—and mysterious—declines in butterfly numbers across the globe.

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image: Mimicry Muses

Mimicry Muses

By | August 1, 2015

The animal world is full of clever solutions to bioengineering challenges.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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1 + 1 = 1

By | July 1, 2015

Nutrient levels in soil don’t add up when food chains combine.

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Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Metazoans in the DNAi Club

Metazoans in the DNAi Club

By | July 1, 2015

A chance discovery results in the first report of DNA-based gene silencing in an animal.

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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