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image: Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

Opinion: Brain Scans in the Courtroom

By | November 23, 2015

Advances in neuroimaging have improved our understanding of the brain, but the resulting data do little to help judges and juries determine criminal culpability.

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image: How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings

By | November 19, 2015

A type of bariatric surgery eliminates gut-to-brain signals that trigger sugar highs, a mouse study shows.  

1 Comment

image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | November 19, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

Brain Fold Tied to Hallucinations

By | November 19, 2015

A shorter crease in the medial prefrontal cortex is linked with a higher risk of schizophrenics experiencing hallucinations.

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image: Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

Rethinking the Rise of Mammals

By | November 16, 2015

Mammals diversified 30 million years later than previously estimated, according to a new analysis of an ancient fossil.

3 Comments

image: Gambling on Reproducibility

Gambling on Reproducibility

By | November 10, 2015

New research finds that observers placing bets in a stock exchange–like environment are pretty good at predicting the replicability of psychology studies.

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image: A Literature Database with Smarts

A Literature Database with Smarts

By | November 3, 2015

Semantic Scholar uses machine reading and vision to extract meaning and impact from academic papers.

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image: A Tiny Missing Link?

A Tiny Missing Link?

By | November 2, 2015

The common ancestor of all apes, including great apes and humans, may have been not-so-great in stature.

2 Comments

image: Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

Appetite, Obesity, and the Brain

By | November 1, 2015

How the foods that make us fattest are not that different from heroin and cocaine

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image: Embracing the Unknown

Embracing the Unknown

By | November 1, 2015

Researchers are showing that ambiguity can be essential to brain development.

1 Comment

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