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image: Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

By | December 1, 2016

Cells with the best traction on a substrate pull their neighbors toward firmer ground.

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Spruce and pine and have relied on similar genetic toolkits for climate adaptation despite millions of years of evolution.

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A family’s collection of antique microscope slides became a trove of genetic information about the eradicated European malaria pathogen.

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image: Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

Oligonucleotide Therapeutics Near Approval

By | December 1, 2016

Successful late-stage clinical trials could mark the maturation of a new drug development platform, but the path to commercialization is not without hurdles.

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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image: The Topography of Teeth

The Topography of Teeth

By | November 29, 2016

Intricate, digital maps of animals’ teeth, created using the same geographical tools used by mapmakers, may help researchers determine the diets of extinct species.

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image: AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

AI Lends Computing Power to Academic Search Engines

By | November 15, 2016

A tool that uses machine learning algorithms to comb and categorize the scientific literature is making waves in neuroscience.

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image: More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

More Success Fixing Sickle Cell Gene with CRISPR

By | November 9, 2016

Researchers say they have sufficient in vitro and animal data to apply for human testing.

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image: Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

Evolution May Have Deleted Neanderthal DNA

By | November 9, 2016

Natural selection may be behind the dearth of Neanderthal DNA in modern humans.

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image: Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

Ebola Evolved to Become More Infectious

By | November 7, 2016

A mutation that appeared early in the 2014 outbreak made the virus more infectious in humans, scientists show.

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