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image: Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

Transgenerational Epigenetics Prepares Plants for Drought

By | January 1, 2017

Plants grown in dry soil produce offspring that are hardier in drought conditions, and DNA methylation appears responsible. 

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image: Infographic: Examining Open Chromatin

Infographic: Examining Open Chromatin

By | January 1, 2017

See how researchers visualize regions of active genes.

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image: Infographic: Keeping RNA Structures in Line

Infographic: Keeping RNA Structures in Line

By | January 1, 2017

Scientists find fewer RNA G-quadruplexes in vivo than in vitro.

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image: Fruit Bats Argue Using Nuanced Communication

Fruit Bats Argue Using Nuanced Communication

By | December 29, 2016

Audio recordings of bats hashing out disputes reveals that their calls are laden with information about identity and intent.

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Oncologists have raised concerns about a mouse study that suggests the vaccine for human papillomavirus could cause brain damage.

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Standard taxonomy lumps together bird species that should be separate, a new study suggests, raising the total number of estimated species from 9,000 to 18,000.

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image: A Tale of Two Tails

A Tale of Two Tails

By | December 7, 2016

An analysis of ancient fish fossils suggests that mammalian and fish tails are fundamentally different structures, each with unique evolutionary histories.

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image: Trumping Science: Part II

Trumping Science: Part II

By | December 6, 2016

As Inauguration Day nears, scientists and science advocates are voicing their unease with the Trump Administration’s potential effects on research.

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Scientists are enlisting the help of pigeons, parrots, crows, jays, and other species to disprove the notion that human cognitive abilities are beyond those of other animals.

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image: Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

Cells Follow Stiffness Gradients by Playing Tug-of-War

By | December 1, 2016

Cells with the best traction on a substrate pull their neighbors toward firmer ground.

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