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» plagiarism and developmental biology

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Smurf-y Old Age

By | April 1, 2013

Flies turning blue help researchers link the deterioration of the intestinal barrier to age-related death.

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Week in Review

By | March 15, 2013

Disgruntled Nobel loser sues; brain trauma researchers search for biomarker of a chronic condition; receptor for novel coronavirus found; the rise of transcriptomics; and ethical oversight of participant-led research

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image: Plagiarism in Successful NSF Proposals

Plagiarism in Successful NSF Proposals

By | March 10, 2013

Using plagiarism detection software, the NSF’s internal watchdog has found almost 100 suspicious cases among the 8,000 projects the agency funded in 2011.

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All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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German Minister Resigns

By | February 12, 2013

The minister of education and research has stepped down after being stripped of her doctorate following accusations of plagiarism.

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German Politician’s PhD Revoked

By | February 7, 2013

The German minister for science and education has been stripped of her PhD after she was found guilty of plagiarizing chunks of the dissertation she wrote in 1980.

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Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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Mettler Toledo
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