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image: Making Good on Research

Making Good on Research

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing nations who engage in capacity building find it bolsters the lives of locals and their own work.

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image: The Next Big One

The Next Big One

By | June 1, 2013

As new infections surface and spread, science meets the challenges with ingenuity and adaptation.

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image: Factoring in Face Time

Factoring in Face Time

By | June 1, 2013

How the study of human social interactions is helping researchers understand the spread of diseases like influenza and HIV

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image: It Takes a Village

It Takes a Village

By | June 1, 2013

Scientists working in developing countries find that giving back to local communities enriches their own research.

3 Comments

image: Week in Review: May 27–30

Week in Review: May 27–30

By | May 31, 2013

The mosquito’s role in malaria virulence; the value of grant review; Europe must embrace GM crops; why roaches avoid sugary bait

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image: BPA Dangers in Pregnancy?

BPA Dangers in Pregnancy?

By | May 28, 2013

Pregnant mice exposed to the chemical used in many plastics have offspring with behavioral abnormalities.

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image: Week in Review, May 20–24

Week in Review, May 20–24

By | May 24, 2013

Journals plagiarizing journals; new immune cells combat diabetes; TB-killing vitamin C; analog cell computers; real time fish memory; ant-pitcher plant mutualism

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image: Inhibit Mitochondria to Live Longer?

Inhibit Mitochondria to Live Longer?

By | May 22, 2013

Researchers find that reducing mitochondrial protein production in some animals can increase lifespan by activating a protective stress response.

3 Comments

image: Rampant Plagiarism in Two Journals

Rampant Plagiarism in Two Journals

By | May 22, 2013

An investigation by The Scientist reveals blatant misuse of open-access articles.

4 Comments

image: Clock Genes Linked to Depression

Clock Genes Linked to Depression

By | May 15, 2013

Patients with major depressive disorder appear to have malfunctioning circadian rhythms, which could lead researchers to new avenues for treatment.

12 Comments

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