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image: What to Do About “Clare Francis”

What to Do About “Clare Francis”

By | September 14, 2013

Anonymous tipsters who allege scientific misconduct can make journal editors squeamish. But should a whistleblower's identity matter?

7 Comments

image: Dermatologist Censured for Plagiarism

Dermatologist Censured for Plagiarism

By | August 6, 2013

A Case Western dermatologist has admitted to plagiarizing a grant she reviewed, plus taking text from eight research papers and a patent application.

0 Comments

image: The Reasons Behind Retractions

The Reasons Behind Retractions

By | June 26, 2013

An analysis of 244 retraction notices shows how journals handle mistakes and fraudulent behavior.

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Unethical Ethics Monitoring

Opinion: Unethical Ethics Monitoring

By | June 25, 2013

Anti-plagiarism service iThenticate breached ethical boundaries in its design and interpretation of a survey of the top ethical concerns among scientific journal editors.

4 Comments

image: More Questionable Stem-Cell Science

More Questionable Stem-Cell Science

By | June 18, 2013

Disgraced stem-cell researcher Hisashi Moriguchi has published three new papers in BMJ Case Reports, including a rehashing of a retracted 2012 paper.

13 Comments

image: Defending Against Plagiarism

Defending Against Plagiarism

By | June 1, 2013

Publishers need to be proactive about detecting and deterring copied text.

5 Comments

image: Week in Review, May 20–24

Week in Review, May 20–24

By | May 24, 2013

Journals plagiarizing journals; new immune cells combat diabetes; TB-killing vitamin C; analog cell computers; real time fish memory; ant-pitcher plant mutualism

0 Comments

image: Rampant Plagiarism in Two Journals

Rampant Plagiarism in Two Journals

By | May 22, 2013

An investigation by The Scientist reveals blatant misuse of open-access articles.

4 Comments

image: Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

By | May 14, 2013

The NIH has required researchers to receive instruction about responsible conduct for more than 20 years, but misconduct is still on the rise.

9 Comments

image: Week in Review

Week in Review

By | March 15, 2013

Disgruntled Nobel loser sues; brain trauma researchers search for biomarker of a chronic condition; receptor for novel coronavirus found; the rise of transcriptomics; and ethical oversight of participant-led research

0 Comments

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