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image: Brains in Action

Brains in Action

By | November 1, 2014

An inspiring lecturer turned Marcus Raichle’s focus from music and history to science. Since then, he has pioneered the use of imaging to study how our brains function.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2014

Leonardo's Brain, The Future of the Brain, Dodging Extinction, and Arrival of the Fittest

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image: Cerebral Sleuths

Cerebral Sleuths

By | November 1, 2014

For neuroscientists, experimental results converge to help crack the case of how the brain functions.

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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: The Rules of Replication

The Rules of Replication

By | November 1, 2014

Should there be standard protocols for how researchers attempt to reproduce the work of others?

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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image: 2014 Life Sciences Salary Survey

2014 Life Sciences Salary Survey

By | November 1, 2014

This year’s data reveal notable variation in compensation for life scientists working in different fields, sectors, and regions of the world.

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image: Neuro-Insights into Holding It

Neuro-Insights into Holding It

By | October 17, 2014

Scientists reveal the neural underpinnings—and muscles tightly linked with—the involuntary flexing of the pelvic floor, which comprises muscles that help us delay urination.

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image: Korean Stem Cell Film Tops Box Office

Korean Stem Cell Film Tops Box Office

By | October 9, 2014

A movie based on the Woo Suk Hwang cloning scandal is popular in South Korea, but the plotline strays from reality.

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image: Chimp Culture Caught on Camera

Chimp Culture Caught on Camera

By | October 1, 2014

Researchers have captured footage of wild chimpanzees teaching each other to use tools, lending support to the idea that humans aren’t the only primates to engage in social learning.

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