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image: Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

Exercise-Induced Muscle Factor Promotes Memory

By | June 23, 2016

Running releases an enzyme that is associated with memory function in mice and humans.  

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image: Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

Creating a DNA Record with CRISPR

By | June 9, 2016

Researchers repurpose a bacterial immune system to be a molecular recording device.

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image: How Dopamine Tunes Working Memory

How Dopamine Tunes Working Memory

By | June 3, 2016

Dopamine receptors in the cortex orient the brain toward the task at hand.

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image: Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

Generating Cardiac Precursor Cells

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers derive cardiac precursors to form cardiac muscle, endothelial, and smooth muscle cells in mice.

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image: Meet An Artist With No Hands

Meet An Artist With No Hands

By | June 1, 2016

The brain can compensate for missing body parts, allowing some people, such as Matthias Buchinger, to function at a very high level despite their disabilities.

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image: The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

The Fatty Acid–Ketone Switch

By | June 1, 2016

In failing hearts, cardiomyocytes change their fuel preference.

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image: In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

In Failing Hearts, Cardiomyocytes Alter Metabolism

By | June 1, 2016

While the heart cells normally burn fatty acids, when things go wrong ketones become the preferred fuel source.

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

1 Comment

image: Observing the Nuclear Pore

Observing the Nuclear Pore

By | May 2, 2016

Scientists visualize nuclear pore complexes for the first time, using high-speed atomic force microscopy.

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