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image: Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

Live Imaging Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

By | November 1, 2016

How to make the most of this rapidly developing technique and a look at what's on the horizon

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image: Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

Opinion: Aging, Just Another Disease

By | November 1, 2016

No longer considered an inevitability, growing older should be and is being treated like a chronic condition. 

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As people continue to tell tall tales, fMRI data show certain brain regions become less busy.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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image: Dogs Respond to Words and Inflection

Dogs Respond to Words and Inflection

By | August 31, 2016

Using an MRI scanner to examine how dogs’ brains process speech, researchers find that our canine companions hear both what we say and how we say it. 

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: The Hormones and Brain Regions Behind Eye Contact

The Hormones and Brain Regions Behind Eye Contact

By | August 1, 2016

Can oxytocin help increase eye contact in patients with autism, thus opening up a whole new world of social interaction?

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image: Faulty Statistics Muddy fMRI Results

Faulty Statistics Muddy fMRI Results

By | July 6, 2016

An analysis of the widely used technique calls into question the validity of 40,000 studies.

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