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image: How Dopamine Tunes Working Memory

How Dopamine Tunes Working Memory

By | June 3, 2016

Dopamine receptors in the cortex orient the brain toward the task at hand.

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image: Meet An Artist With No Hands

Meet An Artist With No Hands

By | June 1, 2016

The brain can compensate for missing body parts, allowing some people, such as Matthias Buchinger, to function at a very high level despite their disabilities.

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image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks.

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.

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image: Locating Language within the Brain

Locating Language within the Brain

By | April 27, 2016

Researchers map the mental semantic systems of podcast listeners.

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image: Psychedelic Neuroimaging

Psychedelic Neuroimaging

By | April 13, 2016

“Ego dissolution,” and other things that happen to the human brain on LSD

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image: Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses

Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses

By | April 7, 2016

Analyzing resting brain scans, researchers can anticipate the brain activities of a person performing a range of tasks. 

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image: Visualizing Interpersonal Connection

Visualizing Interpersonal Connection

By | April 4, 2016

People are attracted to others whose emotions they feel they can easily understand, according to a neuroimaging study.

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