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image: Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses

Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses

By | April 7, 2016

Analyzing resting brain scans, researchers can anticipate the brain activities of a person performing a range of tasks. 

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image: Visualizing Interpersonal Connection

Visualizing Interpersonal Connection

By | April 4, 2016

People are attracted to others whose emotions they feel they can easily understand, according to a neuroimaging study.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Probing Canine Face Recognition

Probing Canine Face Recognition

By | March 4, 2016

Dogs trained to stay still in an MRI machine show activity in the temporal cortex when shown a human face.

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image: Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

Demystifying BOLD fMRI Data

By | February 17, 2016

What does blood oxygen level–dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging actually tell us about brain activity? 

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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