The Scientist

» fMRI and ecology

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image: Brains in Action

Brains in Action

By | November 1, 2014

An inspiring lecturer turned Marcus Raichle’s focus from music and history to science. Since then, he has pioneered the use of imaging to study how our brains function.

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image: Cerebral Sleuths

Cerebral Sleuths

By | November 1, 2014

For neuroscientists, experimental results converge to help crack the case of how the brain functions.

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image: Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

Virus Decimating Spanish Amphibians

By | October 20, 2014

Several toad, newt, and salamander populations are being hit hard by an emerging pathogen in a pristine national park in Spain.

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image: Neuro-Insights into Holding It

Neuro-Insights into Holding It

By | October 17, 2014

Scientists reveal the neural underpinnings—and muscles tightly linked with—the involuntary flexing of the pelvic floor, which comprises muscles that help us delay urination.

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Contributors

By | October 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

Bird Diversity Drops From Forests to Farms

By | September 11, 2014

Farms support less phylogenetically diverse bird populations than forests, but some farms are better than others.

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image: Brain Genetics Paper Retracted

Brain Genetics Paper Retracted

By | September 4, 2014

A study that identified genes linked to communication between different areas of the brain has been retracted by its authors because of statistical flaws. 

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image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

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image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

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image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

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