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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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Thirty percent of bacteria found in babies' guts came from mothers' milk, a study finds.

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image: Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

By | May 8, 2017

Bacterial differences after three-month temperature hikes, modeled after global warming predictions, were evident one year later, a study found.

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image: More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees’ reproduction and honey bees’ ability to fly.

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image: Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

By | May 1, 2017

Researchers are redesigning the humble brick to produce electricity, to clean water and air, and to harvest valuable compounds.

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The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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image: Image of the Day: Fanged Fish

Image of the Day: Fanged Fish

By | April 14, 2017

Poisonous fang blennies (Meiacanthus) are only around 2 inches long but, with their tiny fangs, they can inject predators with a venom that has potent hypotensive effects.

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