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image: Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

Valerie Horsley Gets Under Skin

By | May 1, 2017

The Yale University cell and molecular biologist is probing the deep mysteries of epidermal cells.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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image: Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

Infographic: How the Zebrafish Got Its Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Immune cells called macrophages shuttle cellular messages in the skin.

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image: Cell Lines Gain Cancer-Related Mutations

Cell Lines Gain Cancer-Related Mutations

By | April 27, 2017

A screen of human embryonic stem cell lines finds several that accumulated changes in the gene TP53, including aberrations commonly seen in cancer.

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By analyzing the genomes of 161 dog breeds, scientists discover how and when certain canine breeds emerged.

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image: 45 Feet High and Rising

45 Feet High and Rising

By | April 24, 2017

Maize enthusiast Jason Karl aims to continue breaking his own records for the tallest corn plants ever grown.

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image: Image of the Day: Fungal Forms

Image of the Day: Fungal Forms

By | April 20, 2017

By sequencing and analyzing the genomes of more than 20 species of Penicillium fungi, researches uncovered genes encoding for numerous bioactive compounds, including antibiotics.

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image: Image of the Day: Fanged Fish

Image of the Day: Fanged Fish

By | April 14, 2017

Poisonous fang blennies (Meiacanthus) are only around 2 inches long but, with their tiny fangs, they can inject predators with a venom that has potent hypotensive effects.

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image: CRISPR Corrects Duchenne-Causing Mutations

CRISPR Corrects Duchenne-Causing Mutations

By | April 12, 2017

Using CRISPR-Cpf1 gene editing, researchers have fixed mutations that cause a form of muscular dystrophy in cultured human cardiomyocytes and a mouse model.

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Scientists identify a mutation in the CRY1 gene in people with abnormal sleeping patterns.

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