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image: AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation

AAAAA Is for Arrested Translation

By | July 24, 2015

Multiple consecutive adenosine nucleotides can cause protein translation machinery to stall on messenger RNAs.

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image: Regenerative Cardiomyocytes Found

Regenerative Cardiomyocytes Found

By | June 24, 2015

Specialized cardiac cells in the mouse heart appear to be the long-sought-after proliferative heart cells.

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image: Extra DNA Base Discovered

Extra DNA Base Discovered

By | June 23, 2015

An epigenetic variant of cytosine is stable in the genomes of living mice, suggesting a possible expansion of the DNA alphabet.

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image: The Handedness of Cells

The Handedness of Cells

By | June 17, 2015

Actin—the bones of the cell—has a preference for swirling into a counterclockwise pattern.

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image: Spider and Centipede Venom Remarkably Similar

Spider and Centipede Venom Remarkably Similar

By | June 12, 2015

The predatory toxins employed by animals separated by millions of years of evolution are virtually identical, a study shows.

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image: Prominent Cell Biologist Dies

Prominent Cell Biologist Dies

By | May 4, 2015

Cytoskeleton specialist Alan Hall was best known for unpacking the roles of Rho GTPases.   

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image: Cellular Garbage Disposal Illuminated

Cellular Garbage Disposal Illuminated

By | April 13, 2015

A Harvard team shows how cells label and recognize proteins for degradation.

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image: 2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

2015 Top 10 Innovations: Enter Today!

By | April 13, 2015

Submissions are officially open for this year’s Top 10 Innovations contest.

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image: A Benefit of Failed Pregnancy?

A Benefit of Failed Pregnancy?

By | April 9, 2015

Scientists find a common genetic variant in mothers that decreases the chance of successful pregnancy.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>p53</em>

Book Excerpt from p53

By | April 1, 2015

In Chapter 12, "Of Mice and Men," author Sue Armstrong recounts the point at which researchers moved from working with p53 in tissue culture to studying the gene in animal models.

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