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image: Brightness of Buttercups

Brightness of Buttercups

By | December 13, 2011

Researchers explain the luminous quality of yellow buttercups.

6 Comments

image: Top 7 in Ecology

Top 7 in Ecology

By | December 6, 2011

A snapshot of the most highly ranked articles in ecology, from Faculty of 1000

0 Comments

image: Astronaut Worms Return from Space

Astronaut Worms Return from Space

By | December 1, 2011

After 6 months in orbit, Caenorhabditis elegans return to Earth—alive and well.

3 Comments

image: Eye of Newt

Eye of Newt

By | December 1, 2011

Researchers find that newts are capable of regenerating body parts well into old age.

3 Comments

image: Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

Frank Bradke: Privy to Axon Growth

By | December 1, 2011

Full Professor and Senior Research Group Leader, German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases. Age: 42

5 Comments

image: Newts' New Eyes

Newts' New Eyes

By | December 1, 2011

Cut off a newt’s tail or a leg, or remove a lens from its eye, and it grows back. However, whether newts can continue to do this throughout their lives, or lose the ability as they get older, has remained a mystery. 

3 Comments

image: Flow Cytometry for the Masses

Flow Cytometry for the Masses

By | December 1, 2011

Tagging antibodies with rare earth metals instead of fluorescent molecules turns a veteran technique into a high-throughput powerhouse.

3 Comments

image: Snake Toxin Reveals Pain Clues

Snake Toxin Reveals Pain Clues

By | November 16, 2011

The venom from the Texas coral snake causes intense pain by targeting acid-sensing ion channels, providing researchers with potential new targets for pain therapies.

0 Comments

image: Birth Control Pills and Prostate Cancer

Birth Control Pills and Prostate Cancer

By | November 16, 2011

A new study suggests a possible link between the use of oral contraceptives and rising prostate cancer rates.

6 Comments

image: Endangered Snails Accidentally Frozen

Endangered Snails Accidentally Frozen

By | November 15, 2011

Hundreds of rare giant land snails held in captivity in New Zealand froze to death after the temperature probes in their containers failed.

0 Comments

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