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The infamous "Baby Louie" embryo is a giant oviraptorosaur fossil from China that resembled a gargantuan bird.

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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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The 19th century biologist’s drawings, tainted by scandal, helped bolster, then later dismiss, his biogenetic law.

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image: Learning Your Stripes

Learning Your Stripes

By | May 1, 2017

Science’s lowest common denominator has always been patterns.

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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By analyzing the genomes of 161 dog breeds, scientists discover how and when certain canine breeds emerged.

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The state’s board of education approves new standards that ease up on having students dig into scientific issues relevant to “intelligent design” arguments.

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image: Image of the Day: Fanged Fish

Image of the Day: Fanged Fish

By | April 14, 2017

Poisonous fang blennies (Meiacanthus) are only around 2 inches long but, with their tiny fangs, they can inject predators with a venom that has potent hypotensive effects.

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