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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Accidental Species</em>

Book Excerpt from The Accidental Species

By | December 1, 2013

In Chapter 7, “The Way We Walk,” author Henry Gee describes the first steps taken by the ancestors of Homo sapiens.

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image: Standing Up for Sex

Standing Up for Sex

By | December 1, 2013

Humans evolved the ability to walk on two legs because it allowed them to more accurately size up prospective mates. Or did they?

8 Comments

image: Q & A: Evolution Makes Do

Q & A: Evolution Makes Do

By | July 14, 2013

Evolutionary biologist Andreas Wagner argues that many evolutionary innovations may have non-adaptive origins.

4 Comments

image: Menopause Caused by Men?

Menopause Caused by Men?

By | June 17, 2013

A new hypothesis holds that women become infertile later in life because males prefer younger mates.

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image: Humans Under Pressure

Humans Under Pressure

By | April 25, 2013

Better health care in Gambian villages lead to flip-flopping selection pressures on height and weight.

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image: Did Inbreeding Royals Evolve?

Did Inbreeding Royals Evolve?

By | April 22, 2013

A new study suggests that in the Spanish Habsburg royal family, natural selection may have diminished the most harmful effects of inbreeding.

2 Comments

image: Humans Adapt to Icy Life

Humans Adapt to Icy Life

By | January 30, 2013

A genetic analysis of Siberians finds three genes that have evolved to help the populations weather the frigid winters.

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image: Spot the Moth

Spot the Moth

By | May 1, 2012

It’s a well-known story: The peppered moth’s ancestral typica phenotype is white with dark speckles. 

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Mighty Moth Man

By | May 1, 2012

An evolutionary biologist’s posthumous publication restores the peppered moth to its iconic status as a textbook example of evolution.

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image: Are Humans Still Evolving?

Are Humans Still Evolving?

By | April 30, 2012

Research on an 18th and 19th century Finnish population suggests that agriculture and monogamy may not have stopped human evolution.

46 Comments

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