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image: Similar Data, Different Conclusions

Similar Data, Different Conclusions

By | February 23, 2016

By tweaking certain conditions of a long-running experiment on E. coli, scientists found that some bacteria could be prompted to express a mutant phenotype sooner, without the “generation of new genetic information.” The resulting debate—whether the data support evolutionary theory—is more about semantics than science.

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image: Widespread Plant Immune Tactics

Widespread Plant Immune Tactics

By | February 22, 2016

A survey of plant genomes reveals how different species trick pathogens into triggering their immune defenses.

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image: Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

Breast Milk Sugars Support Infant Gut Health

By | February 18, 2016

Oligosaccharides found in breast milk stimulate the activity of gut bacteria, promoting growth in two animal models of infant malnutrition.

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image: Premature Assault?

Premature Assault?

By | February 9, 2016

Plants may trick bacteria into attacking before the microbial population reaches a critical size, allowing the plants to successfully defend the weak invasion.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Fighting Back

Fighting Back

By | February 1, 2016

Plants can’t run away from attackers, so they’ve evolved unique immune defenses to protect themselves.

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image: Fungal Security Force

Fungal Security Force

By | February 1, 2016

In yew trees, Taxol-producing fungi function as an immune system to ward off pathogens.

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image: Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA

Gene Editing Without Foreign DNA

By | February 1, 2016

Scientists perform plant-genome modifications on crops without using plasmids.

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image: Hydropowered Pollen

Hydropowered Pollen

By | February 1, 2016

A tension-sensing ion channel regulates hydration and germination in pollen.

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image: Mendel in the Hot Seat, 1902

Mendel in the Hot Seat, 1902

By | February 1, 2016

Raphael Weldon’s critiques of Mendelian principles were 100 years ahead of his time.

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